Sunday, November 13, 2011

The Inheritance Of Loss?

(*To Grandpa, Pati & Thatha)

Courtesy: Arjun V.
There are, perhaps, a few people in this world who do not fear Death in anyway.  Nor do they view it as a great evil that steals our life or our loved ones from us or the chance we have to experience everything we can in this world.  No, they in fact view Death as a great change agent; the conveyor belt that takes away the old and brings in the new.  Death to them is not the end of who we are but rather is a transition from one state of being to another.  Death, simply put, is like walking through a door way and into a new room with new things to behold.  But I am sure that even they too, often wonder, about how exactly that transition will take place and what does indeed lie beyond this life. 

Courtesy: Jong
For a lot of us, our fear and resentment of Death stems primarily from three areas.  The first area is that we wonder about how we may die. For example, would we contract and suffer from a deadly illness for a very long period of time before our actual demise or be involved in a gruesome accident of some kind.  The second area is what tangible proof exists about the life or existence beyond this one.  Finally, the third area is, why do we have to have our loved ones and the people we admire, taken away from us.  For we do despair and wonder, if we will ever get to see any of them ever again.  

My photograph
Summed up together, all of these areas stimulate within us a deep sense of loss and bitterness.  For no matter how much we may prepare for Death, it always catches us by surprise.  I would compare it to be being locked into a dark closet.  After a while, when you know the door is about to be opened, you wait in anticipation.  Though when it does finally open, the shaft of bright light from the outside hallway causes our eyes to shut and our mind feel dazed.  It takes a while for everything to refocus and for our body to get readjusted to our new environment.  But once we do, we realize that the anticipation, adrenaline and darkness have all faded away and in its place is a scene that gives us a new sense of freedom to move about as we may choose and explore the world beyond.

Courtesy: Arjun V.
Death works in a similar fashion.  Our release from this life is considered to be the awakening to a new realm of existence.  All religious scriptures and spiritual guru’s describe it as the great reliever of suffering and the liberator of biological decay.  So, if we embrace the concept of Death rather than shun it, we’d find that there is a lot more to it than we might think.  True, when we die we leave behind so many loved ones or alternatively, we lose so many loved ones to it, but in actual fact, we do not lose them or ourselves.  We all may have different religious views, but, many of us can still feel the presence of those who have departed within our hearts and minds.  We also, according to various religious texts, have shared a deep karmic connection between everyone we know and have known, in our past lives.  So it is more than likely that we will see them again in our next existence.

My photograph
Personally, I have come to realize that though there is the supposed “inheritance of loss” that we feel when Death visits us, it instead reminds us that our time in this life is limited and we have to make the most of everything with regard to our family, our work, our relationships and our innate talent.  We have no way of knowing when that hidden clock above our heads will start beeping, when our time is up but we can surely live and experience life with a deeper sense of appreciation than before.  Death also shows us that being angry, holding grudges, feeling hopeless or even useless is just a waste of time.  If we trust in God’s reason for creating the concept of Death and give life our best, we will instead gain, when our time comes, “the inheritance of happiness, freedom, enlightenment and reward for all that we have done in the next life that awaits us.” Next Take please!

8 comments:

  1. The three aspects you metioned would click well with everyone. Well, it did clicked my mind. I feel the same always ; how would my death be, how would after life be, how I would I bare leaving my loved one's behind.

    I guess you lost someone close to you or perhaps you thought of them. Death is inevitable. Those who dies to live, can't live. Those who try to die, will end up leaving. As our birth came along, our death were already fixed.

    So all we need to do is live our life like its our last and share love and peace throughout! :-)

    Loved every essence of the post. Great! :-)

    by the way, im your new follower!:-)

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  2. sorry abt the grammatical errors and typos as i am commenting via mobile. The keypad's bit too annoying!

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  3. Every word here feels right..The way you want to view this inheritance and take it from loss to freedom but I wonder how would we take it when it comes on. It may be easier to feel freedom when we are gone but to view it the same way when we lose a loved one would be the real conquest. The toughest part of Death is that it gives you no chance to think, reconsider. It ends everything in a snap and hence I feel it can't be internalized until faced.Praying to God, this sense prevails when the time comes.

    Touchwood!

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  4. I am in love with the last para.. really.. a wonderful take on death :)

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  5. When a person passes on, it is those close to him/her who are affected the most. For the deceased, death is just another path that he/she must take toward their journey into the spirit world, and from there, to their next life.

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  6. Like the closed cupboard example - really drove home the point.
    Having little thoughts about the world beyond limits my problems with death. The only one being i don't want to leave behind lonely loved ones..and is there anything one can do about that, apart from not having any?

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  7. Good post rohan...hope all is well with you! Why not try and live in the moment...fullest...if death is inevitable :)

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